THEME BY PISTACHI-O

Okay, I’d just like to take a second to talk about a serious matter.

Read More

the-dupont-challenge:

Our STEM All-Star #19 is Rosalind Franklin, Molecular Biologist. Download a printable PDF here.

the-dupont-challenge:

Our STEM All-Star #19 is Rosalind Franklin, Molecular Biologist. Download a printable PDF here.

kitesh:

Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958) was a British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNARNAvirusescoal, and graphiteFranklin is best known for her work on the X-ray diffraction images of DNA which led to discovery of DNA double helix.

Her data, according to Francis Crick, was “the data we actually used” to formulate Crick and Watson’s 1953 hypothesis regarding the structure of DNA. Franklin’s images of X-ray diffraction confirming the helical structure of DNA were shown to Watson without her approval or knowledge. Though this image and her accurate interpretation of the data provided valuable insight into the DNA structure, Franklin’s scientific contributions to the discovery of the double helix are often overlooked. Unpublished drafts of her papers (written just as she was arranging to leave King’s College London) show that she had independently determined the overall B-form of the DNA helix and the location of the phosphate groups on the outside of the structure. Moreover, Franklin personally told Crick and Watson that the backbones had to be on the outside, which was crucial since before this both they and Linus Pauling had independently generated non-illuminating models with the chains inside and the bases pointing outwards. However, her work was published third, in the series of three DNANature articles, led by the paper of Watson and Crick which only hinted at her contribution to their hypothesis.

watchingcbeams:

Rosalind Franklin
Watson and Crick used her x-ray photographs to develop the double helix model of DNA.

watchingcbeams:

Rosalind Franklin

Watson and Crick used her x-ray photographs to develop the double helix model of DNA.

coolsinglepeople:

If we weren’t in the business of celebrating single people ‘round these parts, we would be tempted to set Rosalind Franklin up with the subject of our last post (if, you know, she and Tesla had lived at the same time.)  Like Tesla, Rosalind was one of the great scientific minds of her day, and like Tesla, she was also robbed of credit for her work: (non-single) assholes Watson and Crick stole her research on DNA and used it to formulate their own hypothesis on the structure of the double helix, while completely failing to acknowledge Rosalind’s contributions.  Nonetheless, Rosalind continued to kick scientific ass for the rest of her life, even authoring several papers while undergoing treatment for cancer. So here’s a small portion of the recognition Rosalind deserves: she’s one fantastic single person, and we’re big, big fans.
(Rosalind Franklin submitted by cappyboppy.  Post written by me because she’s SILLY.)        

coolsinglepeople:

If we weren’t in the business of celebrating single people ‘round these parts, we would be tempted to set Rosalind Franklin up with the subject of our last post (if, you know, she and Tesla had lived at the same time.)  Like Tesla, Rosalind was one of the great scientific minds of her day, and like Tesla, she was also robbed of credit for her work: (non-single) assholes Watson and Crick stole her research on DNA and used it to formulate their own hypothesis on the structure of the double helix, while completely failing to acknowledge Rosalind’s contributions.  Nonetheless, Rosalind continued to kick scientific ass for the rest of her life, even authoring several papers while undergoing treatment for cancer. So here’s a small portion of the recognition Rosalind deserves: she’s one fantastic single person, and we’re big, big fans.

(Rosalind Franklin submitted by cappyboppy.  Post written by me because she’s SILLY.)        

Rosalind Franklin 

ilovedna:

Rosalind Franklin was a biologist and chemist, famous for her role in discovering the structure of DNA. 

She learnt about x-ray diffraction techniques in Paris and then in 1951 joined King’s College, London. There she led a research project, aimed at discovering the structure of DNA.

Franklin used pioneering crystallographic X-ray photography to capture images of the double helical structure of DNA. These images helped James Watson to complete and publish his model of DNA.

After her work at Kings she went on to study the tobacco mosaic virus and polio. 

Sadly she died of cancer in 1956 and some believe the cause of her cancer could have been linked to her exposure to radiation whilst using the x-ray techniques that contributed so greatly to Watson’s discovery.

Read: How to Remove a Brain, David Haviland.


It is the darkest hour of the night and it will be filled with blood and fire. She said be quick before, I am gone. For I shall fade in the morning sun. - Dark Goddess, Inkubus Sukkubus.
It is the darkest hour of the night and it will be filled with blood and fire. She said be quick before, I am gone. For I shall fade in the morning sun. - Dark Goddess, Inkubus Sukkubus.